heymow.com - Lawn Mower Racing Forum
September 21, 2014, 01:10:13 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
Want to Join our site? CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Staff List Links Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Peerless 820 Transaxle & 017 Kit  (Read 37414 times)
pedibus2015 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2011, 08:35:24 PM »

   RATIO Addendum, NOTE 'F', Clarification -

   The Snapper commercial walk-behind mower for which the 820-017 transaxle was made was available from the late-1980s into the early-'90s.  I believe Peerless stopped producing replacement 820-017 transaxles in late 1991.  The "Snapper-IPL" ratios were used on the "early" models, changing to the "Peerless-IPL" ratios in about mid-1990.  The Date of Manufacture (DOM) on the aluminum 1/2" x 1-1/8" transaxle ID tag is the first set of four numbers in the lower-left corner of the tag, below the name "PEERLESS" (the "820-017" Model and Spec will be above the PEERLESS), and the first digit of this 4-digit number is the last number of the year the transaxle was made.  If this number starts with '7' (1987), '8' (1988) or '9' (1989), it has the Snapper ratios.  If it starts with '1' (1991), it has the Peerless ratios.  If it starts with '0' (1990), it could have either.  The last three numbers tell the day of manufacture that year -- "002" is January 2nd, "364" is December 30th, etc.  For example, an 820-017 with a DOM of 9182 was manufactured on June 31st, 1989, and should have the Snapper ratios.

   Hope this helps...

Respectfully,
Rodney Rom
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
ktwelding
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2011, 11:50:19 PM »

I new to this i would like to know how to get a hold of this kit and with all the changes do you have good power in all gears and do you get all the speed you need all so . and how fast would you get out of this . what is the best 1 to 1 set up for this app. thanks kt
Logged
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2011, 10:35:43 AM »

I new to this i would like to know how to get a hold of this kit I can sell you this kit.  Go to www.ecrater.com and enter "Gearset Upgrade 3" in the Search box.  This will take you to the Listing, which explains everything.
and with all the changes do you have good power in all gears and do you get all the speed you need also?  Your power will depend on your engine.  This 017 Kit Gearset will give you the fastest possible speed in whatever gear you are in.
and how fast would you get out of this?  That depends on many variables -- engine RPM, tire size, track conditions, etc.
what is the best 1 to 1 set up for this app?  For best belt grip and minimum belt stress, I would run 6"-diameter pulleys.
thanks kt

Hello KT,

   Sorry for the delay -- I don't check my postings all the time. 
   I will answer your questions in bold blue within your message above.

Sincerely,
Rodney Rom
Rom's Reworks
Butler, MO
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
heymow.com - Lawn Mower Racing Forum
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2011, 10:35:43 AM »

 Logged
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2011, 09:35:30 AM »

Heymowers,

   In the AXLE Addendum, Reply #3, the 22-7/32" right axle, P/N 774971, is shown as Obsolete, but it is available again in the 2011 Peerless Price List, should anyone need one.
   The 15-7/16" left axle, P/N 774938, may become obsolete in next year's price list.  Just a heads-up.

Sincerely,
Rodney Rom
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
Stretch44875
Guest
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2011, 08:56:34 AM »

Couple of questions.

Was the 820 series the only peerless 5/6 speed transaxle with 1" axleshafts?  I find transaxles advertised all the time, but people are unwilling/unable to clean/read the id tag.  It's pretty simple for them to measure the shaft diameter.

When calculating the ratio's, just multiply the input x gear x differential/final drive to get the ratio from pulley to axle?

For example, 820-16, in 6th gear, would be input 2.54, 6th .61, and final 8.20, for a ratio of 12.70:1?

Do all 820's have the same input/pinon ratio?  Nevermind, I reread the first post and answered my question, 2.54 input for all 820's

Thanks,
Dennis
Logged
Stretch44875
Guest
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2011, 04:36:22 PM »

This is the reply from Rodney via email.  Thanks Rodney!  His answers are in bold.

Couple of questions.

Four, actually.

Was the 820 series the only Peerless 5-/6-speed transaxle with 1" axle shafts?

The only Peerless Gear-Drive transaxle with 1" axles. They also offered it in 2-, 3- & 4-speeds, as the OEM customer specified, but these are rare.

I find transaxles advertised all the time, but people are unwilling/unable to clean/read the id tag.

It's called "lazy."


It's pretty simple for them to measure the shaft diameter.

Yes, but that doesn't tell any details about the internals or whether it's an 'A'- or 'B'-Input, and most of the time, you need more than axle size.

When calculating the ratios, just multiply the input x gear x differential/final drive to get the ratio from pulley to axle?

Yes.

Do all 820's have the same input/pinion ratio?

Yes, 2.54:1, as noted in the 820/017 Post.

For example, 820-16, in 6th gear, would be input 2.54, 6th .61, and final 8.20 ("8.02"), for a ratio of 12.70:1?

If you mean "820-016," it's 12.43 with the 8.02 Final Drive.

Thanks,
Dennis

You're most welcome.
Sincerely,
Rodney Rom

 


Logged
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2011, 11:20:58 AM »

HeyMowers,

   The first part of this Peerless 820 Transaxle & 017 Kit post tells the parts necessary to install an 017 Kit into an 820 transaxle.  Since August 19, 2011, all of these Peerless part numbers for the 017 Kit parts have become obsolete.  This means that the availability of the 017 Kit is now limited to the remaining inventory in dealers' and distributors' stocks.  If you are thinking about building an 820 with an 017 Kit, buying an NOS 820-017 transaxle, or would just like to prepare for the future, now is the time to locate an 017 Kit.

Respectfully,
Rodney Rom
Rom's Reworks
Butler, MO
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2012, 09:28:40 PM »

RATIO Addendum, 820-010 ratios

   The ratios listed for the 820-010 transaxle apply to the 820-010, -010A and -010B only. The 820-010C and -010D have different 3rd and 4th gear ratios.  Correct original Ratios for the 820-010C and 820-010D are:
1st - 4.55
2nd - 3.08
3rd - 1.78
4th - 1.17
5th - 0.79
6th - 0.61

Sincerely,
Rodney Rom
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
sporty
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 6
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 233



View Profile
« Reply #23 on: April 05, 2012, 08:55:05 PM »

  Reply direct from Peerless Engineering:
"We absolutely do NOT recommend substituting the needle bearing assemblies with the bronze bushings.
"The 820 series transaxle is a heavy-duty unit that is suited for ground engagement applications, and the differential is the most heavily-loaded area of the transaxle.  The bushings will not hold up at all under those conditions, and will quickly lead to failure and transaxle damage.
"The 820-017 has no differential and a solid axle. It was designed specifically for a different type of application. The bushings mostly support the axle solely for the output gear center distance. An inner needle bearing in that design could possibly induce premature failure due to alignment issues.
"Again, do not substitute needle bearing assemblies with the bronze bushings."

   Knowing that, and taking into account the differences between "ground engagement" (plows and tillers) and racing, replacing axle needle bearings with bushings would be one of those trial-and-error attempts you could report back on, if you chose to do it.

   "Knowledge is power!"

Sincerely,
Rodney


I chose to try the bushings and "it don't work".  The bushings galled to the axle at some point and spun them in the case.  They were free when I took it apart though.  Using the stock needle bearings on a live axle that isn't hardened doesn't work well either.

I think I have a solution!  I found the parts below that will have the same O.D. as the original bearing holder pieces and a 1" I.D.  First picture is a needle bearing I got from MSC Direct.  Second pic is a bearing "liner" from McMaster Carr.  The part numbers are in the photos.





Two pieces together to make a needle bearing with inner and outer races.




I will be making spacers to hold everything in place.  May even tack weld the inner race "liners" to the axle to hold them in place.
Logged

Chris Gatesman
RoMow
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 13
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 429


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2012, 02:31:10 PM »

Chris,

   This looks to be an excellent replacement!  However...you will also need to figure out a way to prevent the outer races from turning in the case. The stock bearing/bushing holder sleeves have the 180-degree steps to align with the case bores.  If the hole in the outer races (Photo 5) is deep enough, you could install a pin in the case to align with the hole.
   I don't know how wise it would be to "tack weld" the inner race to the axle.  I'd be afraid it would weaken the race.  Would RC/609 Sleeve Loctite work instead?

Sincerely,
Rodney Rom
Logged

"No matter how many material possessions or awards you may acquire in your lifetime, the only thing you will ever truly own is your reputation." (Age 66)
Rooster
Global Pot Stirrer
Highly Mowtivated
****

Karma: 72
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8405


Winning is always fair!!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #25 on: April 10, 2012, 03:43:16 PM »

never weld on a bearing.....
Logged

Bert stole my cookies!!
 I think he used them to bribe Ed into something naughty?

http://www.cutlooseracing.com
sporty
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 6
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 233



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: April 10, 2012, 05:10:57 PM »

I hear ya and don't think it would be an issue...How about a small ring on both sides of the inner race and tacking these to axle?  This is what is done in Ford 9" rears.  If you don't weld the axle bearing retainers, the axle will work it's way out if your doing a bunch of left turns.  Been there, done that.

Been thinking about how to keep the outer from spinning and not sure what I'll come up with.  The pin is a good idea but I don't think the hole is deep enough.  That is one of the needles you can see in the hole in photo 5
Logged

Chris Gatesman
Rooster
Global Pot Stirrer
Highly Mowtivated
****

Karma: 72
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8405


Winning is always fair!!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: April 10, 2012, 05:19:40 PM »

Bearings are made to very close tolerance...even heating them near what a weld will do will ruin them. A ring welded to the axle might work?
Logged

Bert stole my cookies!!
 I think he used them to bribe Ed into something naughty?

http://www.cutlooseracing.com
sporty
Turf Warrior
**

Karma: 6
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 233



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2012, 08:41:59 PM »

Unable to come up with a better idea, I drilled some 1/8" holes and cut down some 1/8" dowel pins.

There's not much room for a retaining ring so I ground down some key stock to make these pieces.  They will keep the inner races from moving.  I then tack welded them down in the keyway.

Logged

Chris Gatesman
teamgear1973
Newbie
*

Karma: 0
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2012, 08:24:29 PM »

I was wondering if Romow still had the patrs mentioned in the first post?I'm in the process of building a GP mower and want to run a transaxle in it and was wanting to get some parts to lock the axles so I don't have to do any welding.Any info would be greatly appreciated.Thank you! Patrick
Logged

Partick Loveless
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page September 18, 2014, 07:47:53 AM